A little over a week ago Shaun had his summer visit to his allergist. At this point, we typically check-in 4 times a year (not including food challenges or sick visits) with the intention of looking at his allergies, asthma and eczema condition. This allows us to make any changes to his care plan that are needed and keep him up to date with challenges and therapies that would open up Shaun’s diet. 

I spent the afternoon before his appointment gathering my thoughts, paperwork, and questions. I am aware that this preparation** takes extra time, time that we could use for 1,000 other things we need to be doing. (I left our family cottage early to come home and make sure things were in order for our time with Dr. H) But experience is an excellent teacher, and I know how critical it is to show up prepared for these appointments!  

 

** Prep work is a theme of allergy life! Food prep, planning meals and grocery shopping, extra vacation prep, food product research, prep a separate lunch for a family outing, prep for the beach or the baseball game … I could go on. Prep work is another insurance policy, paid for with upfront time, that makes allergy life manageable and ultimately safer!

 

At the beginning of the appointment, a medical assistant always takes Shaun’s height and weight. And I am excited to announce that Shaun officially weighs 30lbs!!! I know, 30 lbs, it seems silly but for half of his little life, we have spent countless hours focusing and stressing over his growth. He was born small but shortly after his eczema started we began to notice he had fallen off his growth curve. Shaun’s pediatrician and allergist referred us to the pediatric GI & nutrition practice leading us on a 3-year journey that I will share with you another time. But I tell you all this because 30lbs is a big win for us, in fact, we might even throw a party! 

With the appointment off to a great start, we dove into the state of Shaun’s asthma and eczema. Dr. H was happy to see and hear that it’s well managed currently and recommend that we just continue our current care plan. I’m not going to lie, it took a long time to get to a place where the care plan didn’t change with every doctor visit but here we are, no changes to the care plan and it feels really good. 

Next up, allergies! Dr. H suggests we use the appointment to look at Shaun’s environmental allergies. It had been a while and given his struggle this past spring she wanted to have more recent data in his chart. So we agreed to do an environmental skin panel and would test his food allergies by blood work (adding his food allergies to the skin panel would have been a lot given the environmental panel required 24 skin pricks). 

 

 

This was the part of the appointment I was grateful to have John with me! Shaun is now old enough to know what was about to happen and he got incredibly upset. I held Shaun until they were ready to apply the skin test. Then I was able to pass him to John who could hold him tightly enough to give the staff a chance to administer the test. 

 

Is it hard to watch your child freak out and scream and squirm because they are upset by the skin test? 

 

Yes, it is horribly hard and frankly heartbreaking. 

 

But I am an adult. And I know that this test, although momentarily uncomfortable and upsetting (for him and me), will yield valuable information. Information that will help us as we continue to expand his world! 

So despite the screams forcing their way out of his little body, we move forward with the test. It is important. 

Once the test has been administered to his skin we do our best to comfort him as we wait the required 15 minutes for his body to react. A nigh-night (blankie/woobie/etc.), dum dum pop, a YouTube video about buoyancy and density (following up on some concepts we discussed while at the ocean) and he was calmer and we were ready for Dr. H to look at his skin. 

We lifted his shirt and I laughed a little … because sometimes in life it’s laugh or cry. 

 

An untrained eye could have looked at Shaun’s back and known that he is allergic to almost every environmental stimulus they tested him for. 

 

 

And even though I anticipated this result before we arrived for the appointment, there is something that sinks inside you when you see it painted in bright red and white splotches on your child back. 

 

Knowing this did give us the opportunity to discuss the possible benefits of allergy shots for Shaun and what that entails. So we will take the information given to us, by Dr. H, do more research and talk with Shaun about if this is something we want to start with him. This therapy is not comfortable short term (who wants to go get weekly shots?) but might provide him major relief long-term. 

We wrapped up our appointment by verifying the prescription refills he needs, getting hard copies of the necessary school forms for September and leaving with a lab order for blood work. 

Overall, it was a great appointment. We were able to cover everything we needed to discuss. We gathered updated information about Shaun’s current response to environmental allergies and we left with the forms and medications we need until we return in November. 

I’m so grateful for Dr. H and the staff at CTA&A. I know Shaun has the best care! And as an allergy mom, I can’t ask for anything more. 

 

To great doctors, 

 

~ LC 

 

P.S. – (Is a ps a thing in a blog?) Shaun and I went this week to get his blood work done. The screams were worse than the skin test but we both survived. Nothing a game of mini-golf can’t fix! Results will be in soon, I will keep you posted! 

 

 

 

 

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Linda Corning

Linda is one half of the team here at The Art of Allergies. Linda is a child-care provider of over a decade and has been a driving force of allergy advocacy. Not only finding new ways to reinvent how life works with food allergies, but also taking an active role in the allergy community.

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